Articles

Voters blow back on windmills

Voters in Bay County recalled a township supervisor who was pushing the development of wind farms. Jonesfield Township in Saginaw County rejected a zoning change that would have enabled more turbines. And in Baraga County, voters turned down a zoning ordinance sought by a British wind power developer. These are small communities, but indicative of the chronic problem utility companies have in siting wind farms. 
17 May 2019

No vote on controversial wind turbine

In addition to the company, board members heard from residents, including Nicole Valliere, who purchased the house immediately next door to the Pacheco property for $925,000 in March. Valliere told board members she was not aware of the turbine plans until after the sale closed and would never have purchased the property if the information was available. “We had no idea this was happening,” she said. “We never, ever, ever would’ve purchased our home.”
15 May 2019

SD Public Utilities Commission issues $30,000 max fine for southeastern wind farm's permit violation

Commissioner Kristie Fiegen said the fact that Prevailing Wind violated one of many conditions in their permits so early in their construction was a major concern -- especially for a project of its size. ...in order to avoid a costly civil lawsuit. Prevailing Wind will pay the maximum fine of $10,000 per day of the violation, totaling $30,000. The money will go to the permanent school fund.
15 May 2019

Commissioner: Energy firm could sue

Commissioner David Orr, appointed after the resignation of ex-wife Jennifer Orr, said Thursday evening that he is in favor of the project if officials can put the right deal together. But he warned he does not think the developer, Apex Clean Energy, will simply go away if officials cannot agree on agreements for road use, decommissioning and payments in lieu of taxes.
10 May 2019

Wind farm battle may be nearing the end

"We've done something in the state of North Dakota that's never been done before, as far as the consolidation of people the project itself with all the strikes against it also hurt it as well." Said Buntrock. PNE later filed a suit claiming some of the testimony was incorrect or misleading and could have swayed the commission's vote. But in a surprising move, the suit was dropped without reason in late April 
9 May 2019

Berkshire takes tax hit as victim of ‘Ponzi-type’ solar scheme

“In December 2018 and during the first quarter of 2019, we learned of allegations by federal authorities of fraudulent income conduct by the sponsor of these funds,” Berkshire said Saturday in the filing, without naming the sponsor. “As a result of our investigation into these allegations, we now believe that it is more likely than not that the income tax benefits that we recognized are not valid.”
9 May 2019

Commissioner ignores safety risks

The bottom line is that this group of big-city representatives along with Stacy want the setbacks reduced so more turbines can be installed in Seneca County, consuming more taxpayer funded subsidies, while ignoring the increased safety risks and quality of life of rural residents. If Stacy truly cared about the well being of Ohio and county residents, she and the other pro-wind advocates would be lengthening the setbacks instead of trying to shorten them. This is exactly what is happening in other states.
9 May 2019

Hydro-Québec poised to profit from U.S. thirst for green energy

“The contract with New York is far from being signed,” Pineau said. “The mayor of New York City has said he wants to start negotiating, so that’s a very good sign. If he goes public it means he’s committed. … But it’s never easy. In principle everyone loves renewable energy, but when it comes to the invoice and the price tag, sometimes people have second thoughts.” In the case of New York City, that price tag includes $2.9 billion for U.S. developers to run the line through the state of New York, plus hundreds of millions more for Hydro-Québec to bring the line from the border to the Hertel converter station on Montreal’s South Shore.
9 May 2019

Resident outcry prompts wind law tabling in Worth

The board planned to approve the law Wednesday, but during a meeting that attracted more than 50 people to the town barn, several residents criticized the legislation, which they viewed as too restrictive for wind development, and urged the board to amend it before taking action. The proposed law limits turbine height for projects that would generate more than 100 kilowatts of electricity to 400 feet. Developers have to erect turbines and components away from property lines, structures and roads at a distance of five times their height. Commercial wind farm turbines cannot emit noise louder than 35 A-weighted decibels, from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. and 25 A-weighted decibels, from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. 
9 May 2019

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